José Saramago / The Work / Bibliography

The notebook

The notebook
2009

They told me that they have reserved a space for me on the blog and that I should write for it, whatever it is, comments, reflections, simple opinions about this and that, in short, whatever comes to be scythe

Foundation

Store

Portugal

The notebook

2018 (1st edition at Porto Editora; 3rd edition)


Language
Portuguese

The calligraphy on the cover is by the writer João de Melo

(in one volume with O Caderno 2 — includes the chronicles of José Saramago's blog from September 2008 to November 2009).

Preface by Umberto Eco, originally published in the Italian edition of O Caderno with the chanela by Bollati Boninghieri, 2009.

“They told me they've reserved a space for me on the blog and that I should write to him, whatever, comments, reflections, simple opinions about this and that, in short, whatever comes to be like a sickle. This work brings together a set of daily texts marked out temporarily between September 2008 and November 2009. It represents reflections, opinions, suggestions, criticisms of the most diverse subjects and on the most diverse issues. A work under construction that includes Saramago's daily articles published on the infinite page of the Internet.” José Saramago

“[…] I'm writing this preface because I feel I have some experience in common with my friend Saramago, which is writing books (on the one hand), and, on the other hand, dealing with criticism of customs in a weekly. As the second type of writing is clearer and more informative than the other, many people have asked me if I wouldn't pour broader reflections from the larger books into the small periodic pieces. No, I answer, it teaches me experience (but I believe it teaches it to all who find themselves in a similar situation) which is the impulse of irritation, the satirical hint, the hastily written critical whip, which will then furnish the material for an essay reflection or more developed narrative. It's the daily writing that inspires the most committed works, not the other way around.” Umberto Eco